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How to Write Flash Fiction may seem obvious, but I’ve certainly never been able to do it.

A flash fiction is small, but suggests a wider story-world: think of it a keyhole that the reader looks through to see something much bigger.

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An interview with Julianna Baggott, author of Pure.

Baggott: You want the greatest trick for writing a novel? Here it is: imagine urgently whispering your story into one person’s ear—and only one. This one visualization will clarify every word choice you make.

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The truth about your summer reading plans. (For me, replace War and Peace with In Search of Lost Time.)

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Madeline Miller talks books both disappointing and re-readable.

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What writers need to know about creating mystery in non-mystery – and also mystery – stories.

Tying in conditions of consequence to unsolved mysteries is critical — if the character doesn’t find her keys, she can’t get to the hospital, if she can’t get to the hospital, she won’t learn the identity of the man who saved her from that busload of pterodactyls, if she can’t uncover his identity, she won’t learn why she’s being hunted by that busload of pterodactyls. The audience must feel that the mystery has weight and meaning and pterodactyls.

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Gwendoline Riley talks about writing and finding herself at work on her fifth novel in only her early thirties.

When we meet in a restaurant near Riley’s Shepherd’s Bush home, she concedes that her protagonists are always fairly similar to her. “I’ve tried writing in the third person,” she says. “I can’t do it – it always sounds so false.” What about writing as a male narrator? Riley gives a semi-comic shudder. “Ugh, men’s brains! That vipers’ nest? No.”

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Why my office should be yellow, red and orange.

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Writing lessons from a third-grader.

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5. Sleep.
4. Eat.
3. Read.
2. Alternate between Facebook and Twitter.
1. Scour the first 300 recommendations Amazon has for me – I’m not joking.

Now here are the top five things Jen Moody does instead of writing.

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Tips on how to publish and e-book.

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We laugh at these publishers all the time – okay, to the point that it’s not actually amusing anymore – but from time to time I still like to remind myself that Harry Potter was rejected 12 times.

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How not to approach a literary agent.

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On LitReactor, which is awesome:

- a guide to setting

- the first-person in fantasy

- a guide to library research

- sharing writing environments

- how to win friends and influence readers

Why do I even bother with this blog? Let’s all just go read LitReactor.

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25 Ways to Earn Your Audience

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